PS: Property is Not for Personal Use | Chicago Association of REALTORS®

NAR’s Pathways to Professionalism are professional courtesies REALTORS® should show to the public, property and their peers. While these should be honored, they are also voluntary and cannot form a basis for a Professional Standards/Ethics complaint. So, why do we care? Up to 80 percent of calls we receive focus on professionalism, or lack thereof, which is damaging to our industry and the REALTOR® brand. In this new series, focused on “True Tales of Professionalism,” we’ll examine some cringe-worthy, real life examples of REALTORS® who didn’t violate the Code of Ethics, but certainly missed the mark on professionalism.


Today, let’s look at #7 under “Respect for Property”:

“Be considerate of the seller’s property. Do not allow anyone to eat, drink, smoke, dispose of trash, use bathing or sleeping facilities, or bring pets. Leave the house as you found it unless instructed otherwise.”

True story: A listing broker received a call from a REALTOR®. “I’m with a client, right around the corner from your listing. Do you mind if we come by within the next few minutes?”

“Sure,” the listing broker said. “You can head right over.”

Due to the tight turnaround on time, the listing broker didn’t inform the seller the REALTOR® and client were stopping by. So, a few minutes later, when the seller hears noises coming from the unit, he goes downstairs to investigate. When entering the unit, he finds the REALTOR® and the client IN BED! We can leave the rest to your imagination.

In case you didn’t know, listings are not for your personal entertainment or pleasure. Not only is this completely unprofessional, there could also be legal implications.

We strongly encourage you practice with Pathways to Professionalism in mind, which will ensure you are giving the highest level of service to your clients and, ultimately, protecting your reputation. After all, this business is built on respect and trust.

Check back regularly for more from our “True Tales of Professionalism” series. Questions? Feel free to reach out to Professional Standards with any questions, comments or concerns.